Darvish Khan reviews “The Making of a Terrorist”, by Alfredo Wonk

The best selling “The Making of a Terrorist”, by Alfredo Wonk, at 900 pages, might kill you if it fell on your head. Which is why you should wear your favorite Superbowl helmet when reading it. Don’t lightly peruse this tome and underestimate its impact.

Terrorist sociology, it turns out-  confirmed by the author’s exhaustive research, is remarkably simple: volcanic anger will erupt; the problem is political tectonics. The North American Plate and its proxy Plates are subducting the Middle Eastern Plate and causing an upheaval. This process has ramped up especially since the post WWII period. The 1953 CIA takedown of the democratically elected Prime Minister of Iran, Dr Mohammad Mossadegh, was an early seismic event that has promised continued aftershocks. As they say, the rest is history.

The author’s basic and astute point is that when US Predator drones blow up innocents in the “War on Terror”, body parts from decimated wedding parties and hospitals in the Middle East rise in a trajectory that cause them to land in San Bernardino, CA, New York, NY, and other places. The outrage from such gratuitous carnage raining down on innocent America is more than enough to justify unlimited political and financial support for defending America from howling fanatics. And so a Trump, Cruz and Hillary, not to mention a Bush and Obama, are born with a ready electorate.

Buy as many copies of this book as you possibly can, ascend the nearest skyscraper and hurl them one by one on the hapless pedestrians crawling the canyons below. America will have its poetic revenge.

 

 

 

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3 Responses to Darvish Khan reviews “The Making of a Terrorist”, by Alfredo Wonk

  1. Friend says:

    Alfredo Wonk sounds like a joke-novelty name! I suppose Alfredo Gonzo would be too obvious
    Theres an idea for you, Darvish
    Present your narrative or argument in a post via the device of a review about a book that only exists in your Darvish literary riposte imaginings

  2. Friend says:

    I must be onto something. A web search reveals no such book

  3. bill gannett says:

    Dear Friend;

    This book as it is hurled onto the innocents below justifies its non-existence.

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